Sankara Azéta

Sankara Azéta is a Fairtrade cocoa farmer and store owner in Côte d'Ivoire.

Meet Sankara

Meet Sankara Azéta. Sankara is a 39-year-old cocoa farmer and member of the ECAMOM cooperative. She lives in a Sokoura, Côte d’Ivoire. Before becoming a Fairtrade farmer, Sankara worked as nurse’s aide, but she has always felt called to cocoa farming. “I preferred to produce cocoa because my parents have cocoa fields,” says Sankara. “I know about cocoa.”

Partnership with Fairtrade

Sankara has been involved with Fairtrade since 2010. Typically, when cocoa production is down, farmers’ incomes suffer – but because of Fairtrade, Sankara worries less about her finances. With money combined from the Fairtrade Premium and cocoa farming, she opened a store that helps supplement her income in times when cocoa production is lower.

Sankara is also thankful for the things her community has been able to accomplish since becoming a part of Fairtrade. Because of the Fairtrade Premium, the village of Sokoura built a water pump and school in town, so that the town’s children didn’t have to walk a long distance to school in a neighboring town.

“This initiative has made a big difference in the lives of the people,” says Sankara. “If a child has to walk for miles to get to school, many parents will refuse to enroll their children in school. Also, the pump allows the students to drink water and it allows the community to drink clean water.”

The future with Fairtrade is positive. There is a proverb in Moré that says: ignorance is a disease, ignorance is a poison for us. I think about my future, I have to take it in charge. I want to build a house, but autonomous and continue the collaboration with Fairtrade.

Sankara Azéta, Fairtrade cocoa farmer

There’s more to learn

Sankara has plenty of thoughts on how Fairtrade can continue to partner with farmers in Côte d’Ivoire to to build prosperity for future generations of cocoa farmers. She believes that there should be Fairtrade vocational training centers for children who plan to make a career farming. “It is not enough to send children to school. They need to be supervised so that tomorrow they can be autonomous,” says Sankara.